2021 Seminar Series: Join us on May 10

Coming up on Monday, May 10th is our next Seminar in Early Music Performance, “Introduction to French Baroque Music.” The program will begin at 7:30 PM, with a Meet & Greet at 7:15 PM. (All times are Eastern Daylight Time.) Read More ›

2021 Seminar Series: Join us on April 12

This seminar will be primarily a playing session. HPRS’ 2020-20201 Music Director Lewis R. Baratz, Ph.D. and Guest Presenter Allen Hamrick will lead us through two-part recorder music from the 16th, 17th, and early 18th centuries. The repertory list includes arrangements of two-part pieces (bicinia) by Orlando di Lasso and Orazio Vecchi, a fantasia by Thomas Morley, three of the duets from the Fluyten Lusthof of Jacob van Eyck, and sonatas by Godfrey Finger and Jacques Paisible. Read More ›

2021 Seminar Series: Join us on February 8

For this month’s Seminar, on February 8th, 2021, we will meet via Zoom at 7:15 P.M. for a Meet-&-Greet. At 7:30 P.M. Lewis Baratz will discuss ornamentation in the late Baroque era, c. 1700 to 1750. We will learn about “French graces,” how to play trills, mordants, and appoggiaturas, and then examine the more florid ornamentation seen in the sonatas of Handel, Telemann, Babell, Corelli, and Geminiani. Read More ›

2021 Seminar Series: Join us on January 11

Coming up on Monday, January 11, 2021, at 7:15 P.M. EST, USA, will be Seminar #4, Playing 17th-century Italian Music, of the Seminar Series in Early Music Performance of the Highland Park Recorder Society. Read More ›

2021 Seminar Series: Join us on December 14

In December’s early music seminar, we will indulge in the art of ornamentation during the late Renaissance and explore the virtuoso variation technique of the early 17th century. We will explore the many examples of Sylvesto Ganassi (1535) and Diego Ortiz (1553) and learn to decode the variation technique of the 17th-century Dutch recorder virtuoso Jacob van Eyck. Read More ›

Grant funding has been provided by the Middlesex County Board of Chosen Freeholders Through a Grant from the Middlesex County Cultural and Arts Trust Fund.